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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Natural Sciences: Chemistry Unit
Course Name Course Number
Chemistry for Allied Health Majors CHEM 10
  • Perform calculations, set up and solve problems using conversion factors.
  • Perform calculations, set up and solve problems using conversion factors
Chemistry of Everyday Life CHEM 9
  • Chem9 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of : \na.\tThe general structure of the atom (nuclear\/orbital model understanding)\nb.\tthe properties of the subatomic particles\nc.\tthe composition of an atom (number of protons, neutrons, electrons) when provided with common information from a periodic table\nd.\tAtomic number as it relates to subatomic particles\ne.\tMass number as it relates to subatomic particles\nf.\tAtomic mass as it relates to subatomic particles\n
General Chemistry I CHEM 50
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: \na.\tMole-to-mole conversions\nb.\tMole-to-mass conversions\nc.\tMass-to-mass conversions\nd.\tIdentifying limiting reactant\ne.\tCalculating the theoretical yield\nf.\tCalculating the amount of excess reactant\n
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: \na. calculating molarity \nb. making dilutions \nc. performing stoichiometric calculations. \n
General Chemistry I - Honors CHEM 50H
  • Chem 50 students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of solution chemistry such as: \na. calculating molarity \nb. making dilutions \nc. performing stoichiometric calculations. \n
  • Chem 50H students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of stoichiometric principles, such as: \na.\tMole-to-mole conversions\nb.\tMole-to-mass conversions\nc.\tMass-to-mass conversions\nd.\tIdentifying limiting reactant\ne.\tCalculating the theoretical yield\nf.\tCalculating the amount of excess reactant\n
General Chemistry II CHEM 51
  • By using the concept of Le Chatelier’s Principle, students will be able to \na.\tpredict the effect that causes the reaction to shift toward products in a gas phase reaction initially at equilibrium. \nb.\tpredict the correct effect of different stresses on a gas phase reaction at equilibrium \nc.\tpredict the correct effect of adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system of a slightly soluble salt that was used in the “Review of \nEquilibrium Systems” experiment \nd.\tpredict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding common ion in the aqueous phase equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment \ne.\tpredict the correct effect (by color of solution) from adding a substance that reacts with a component in the equilibrium system used in the “Review of Equilibrium Systems” experiment. \nThe questions focused on determining the direction of shift of a reaction upon adding a variety of stresses to a system at equilibrium. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to \na.\texamine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system \nb.\texamine and predict the effect of common ions on an aqueous equilibrium system as applied to the Solubility Procudt Constant (Ksp) Experiment \nc.\tpredicting degree of solubility based on solubility product constants \nd.\tcalculating the value of the solubility of a solution containing a common ion \nThe questions focused on determination of solubility, understanding the concept of Ksp, and the effects of the common ion effect on solubility. Some of the questions related directly to experiences that they had in several lab experiments.
  • Chem 51 students will be able to \na.\tDefine and identify a buffer solution\nb.\tDetermine the pH of a buffer solution\nc.\tPredict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base\nd.\tDetermine the chemical quantitates needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration\n
  • Outcomes (SLO statement): \nChem 51 students will be able to: \na.\tDefine and identify a buffer solution \nb.\tDetermine the pH of a buffer solution \nc.\tPredict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base \nd.\tDetermine the chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration \n
  • SLO on Buffers focused on the following course measurable objective: \nPrepare buffer solutions of a given pH and molarity and predict the response of the buffers to additions of acids and bases. \n\n\nOutcomes (SLO statement): \nChem 51 students will be able to: \na.\tDefine and identify a buffer solution \nb.\tDetermine the pH of a buffer solution \nc.\tPredict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base \nd.\tDetermine the chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration \n\n
General Chemistry II - Honors CHEM 51H
  • Chem 51 students will be able to \na.\tDefine and identify a buffer solution\nb.\tDetermine the pH of a buffer solution\nc.\tPredict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base\nd.\tDetermine the chemical quantitates needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration\n
  • Chem 51 students will be able to: \na.\tDefine and identify a buffer solution \nb.\tDetermine the pH of a buffer solution \nc.\tPredict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base \nd.\tDetermine the chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration \n\n
  • Outcomes (SLO statement): \nChem 51 students will be able to: \na.\tDefine and identify a buffer solution \nb.\tDetermine the pH of a buffer solution \nc.\tPredict the change in pH of a buffer solution upon addition of a strong acid or base \nd.\tDetermine the chemical quantities needed in order to prepare a buffer solution of given pH and acid or base concentration \n
Introduction to General Chemistry CHEM 40
  • Chemistry 40 students will be able to apply the principles of stoichiometry to calculate the quantities of any component in a balanced chemical reaction equation.
  • Molecular Geometry) - students will be able to assign a molecular geometry of linear, bent, trigonal planar, trigonal pyramidal, or tetrahedral to a given molecule.
  • Students will be able to calculate the percent composition, molar masses, empirical and molecular formula of compounds from appropriate data.
Introductory Organic and Biochemistry CHEM 20
  • CHEM 20 students will be able to:\n• Predict the products of replication.\n• Predict the product of transcription.\n• Predict the product of translation from a given sequence of DNA.\n• Predict changes in the translation product that would result from mutation in \nthe DNA sequence.
  • Students will be able to:\nDescribe the fate of proteins that enter the body.\nDescribe what happens to the excess amino acids in the body?\nDescribe the ultimate fate of the nitrogen atoms from excess amino acids?\nDescribe TWO different possible fates of the carbon skeletons from excess amino acids.
  • CHEM 20 students will be able to: \n \n•\tPredict the products of replication. \n•\tPredict the product of transcription. \n•\tPredict the product of translation from a given sequence of DNA. \n•\tPredict changes in the translation product that would result from mutation in the DNA sequence. \n
  • Given a segment of DNA, students will be able to:\n1.\tIdentify which strand is used for transcription and draw the primary structure of the mRNA produced in the transcription underneath the strand.\t\t\t\t\n\n2.\tWrite the sequence of polypeptide that will be produced from the DNA. \n\n3.\tClearly describe the effect on the protein chain when a base pair is mutated.\n
Organic Chemistry CHEM 80
  • Provided with a molecular formula and the infrared (IR), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 80 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the molecule.\n\nThe assessment consisted of questions in a multiple-choice standardized-exam format (ACS Standardized National Exam), focusing on IR and NMR. In addition, a student survey was administered to gauge the effectiveness of replacing the old computers with new ones in the CTC Lab. Some of the questions targeted direct experience using the CTC lab.
Organic Chemistry CHEM 81
  • SLO 2 (Evaluation of a Multi-Step Synthesis) - CHEM 81 students will be able to evaluate a mechanism of a multi-step synthesis reaction.
  • Provided with a molecular formula and the infrared (IR), 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR spectra for an unknown organic molecule, CHEM 81 students will be able to propose a correct structure for the unknown molecule.
Organic Chemistry CHEM 80
  • CHEM 80 students will be able to analyze 3D, Fischer and Newman projection drawings to determine their \nstereochemical designations, determine isomeric relationships between two drawings, and correlate stereoisomerism \nwith physical properties such as optical rotation of light.
  • CHEM 80 students will be able to demonstrate the effectiveness of the CTC Lab. These updated tools promote their success in organic chemistry.
Organic Chemistry CHEM 81
  • CHEM 81 students will be able to\na. Predict the product(s) of reactions involving carboxylic acids and their derivatives \nb. Provide the reagents needed to transform carboxylic acids and their derivatives\nc. Compare relative reactivities of carboxylic acids and their derivatives\nd. Write the mechanism for reactions involving carboxylic acids and their derivatives
Special Projects in Chemistry CHEM 99
  • Chem 99 students will build their confidence to enroll in the next chemistry course through review of chemistry concepts essential for success in the next sequential chemistry course.
  • CHEM 99 students actively participate in preparing and conducting independent research, performing data analysis, and constructing presentations of their research results.