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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Humanities & Social Sciences: Geography & Political Science Unit
Course Name Course Number
Physical Geography - Honors GEOG 1H
  • Distinguish between internal, mountain-building processes and external, landform-shaping processes.
  • Locate major physical features of Earth on a series of world maps.
  • Compare and correlate the Earth’s major climates and biomes.
  • Examine the physical forces and processes which operate within the natural environment.
  • Describe common patterns of temperature and temperature inversions, high and low pressure, ocean and land winds, global winds, rain and desert patterns.
  • Define geography as an integrative discipline using examples of the Earth’s four spheres.
  • Apply geographical methodology in the interpretation of spatial relationships involving distance, area and direction on the Earth’s surface.
  • Recognize and identify how human and physical processes differ from place to place.
African American\/Black Politics POLI 35
  • Students will be able to identify significant changes that have occurred in African-American political participation since the passage of the Voting Rights Act.
  • Students will be able to assess the success of African Americans in attaining representation in various levels of government.
Cartography GEOG 12
  • Employ an appropriate geographic referencing system (datum, projection, coordinate system) for a given purpose.
  • Select and apply ethical and appropriate data model, map scale, map elements, symbolization and color to produce maps that effectively communicate quantitative and qualitative geographic data.
  • Categorize and describe different types of maps (thematic, reference…) and be able to give examples of how they are used.
  • Describe the components of a map (map elements).
  • Critique maps for appropriate use of cartographic design principles.
Comparative Politics POLI 2
  • Explain ethnic group conflict, and political institutions for managing ethnic group conflict.
  • Distinguish among regime types and their central features.
  • Analyze political systems by using the comparative method.
  • Analyze the role of political parties, interest groups, elections and the mass media in various countries.
  • Explain the impact of regional, economic, historical and cultural factors on political institutions and behavior.
  • Compare political systems, both in theory and with actual country examples.
  • Identify the role of the state.
  • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of proportional representation and single member district plurality as electoral methods.
  • Identify the key features of parliamentary and presidential forms of government and identify their advantages and disadvantages.\n
Environmental Politics POLI 10
  • Students should be able to identify and compare competing models of sustainable political economy.
  • Students should be able to define sustainability taking account of social, economic, and environmental indicators.
Geography of California GEOG 30
  • Analyze the use of natural resources in the state, particularly the role of water in the development of both the economic and social landscape of California.
  • Analyze the influence of varying cultural and ethnic groups in the shaping of the cultural landscapes of California.
  • Explain the origins and development of agriculture and industry in California.
  • Explain patterns of urban development in the state and distinguish current trends in urban development in California.
  • Describe the physical processes that shape the natural environments of California.
  • Recognize and evaluate how human and physical processes differ from place to place and analyze the distributional and locational relationship of things in the state of California.
  • Analyze the relationship between humans and the environment of California.
Geospatial Concepts GEOG 9
  • Outline the development of cartography and mapping techniques
  • Identify and interpret spatial patterns and relationships
  • critique a map on its ability to communicate qualitative and quantitative information through its use of \nsymbolization, color, layout, orientation, scale, texture, classification schemes, and other cartographic elements\n
  • Assess how maps can be used to mislead, entice, restrict, control, and propagandize
  • Outline the key components and uses of a geographic information system (GIS)
  • Describe the size, shape and other geophysical properties of Earth.
  • Categorize map projections based on their ability to preserve map conformality and equivalence
  • Compare and contrast commonly used locational systems and datums
  • Measure distances and areas from maps based on indicated scale
  • Utilize the tools and methodologies used in navigation
  • Interpret topographic representations on maps to identify physical geographic features and land forms
  • Differentiate map feature generalization operations and evaluate their potential consequences
  • Justify the use of certain map types for particular geographic applications
  • Distinguish among characteristics of remotely sensed data, sensing platforms, and aerial image analysis
Human Geography GEOG 2
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Evaluate the relationship of humans and the environment.
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
Human Geography - Honors GEOG 2H
  • Describe the tools and theories used in geographic research.
  • Analyze the spatial variation of humans and their activities around the world.
  • Describe human impacts on the environment including impacts of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources.
  • Explain spatial variation of and describe patterns of cultural and social expression including language, religion, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, political processes, urbanization, development, agriculture, manufacturing and service economies.
  • Synthesize theories of human migration to explain historical and contemporary patterns of human mobility.
  • Describe the distribution of humans globally and explain the tools used by geographers to evaluate human population change.
  • Analyze the spatial expression and cultural impacts of contemporary globalization.
  • Describe the scope of the discipline of geography and the tools used by geographers to study human processes on the earth.
  • Evaluate the relationship between humans and the environment.
International Relations POLI 9
  • Define, explain, analyze and compare core theories in International Relations and explain which theory best describes international relations and why.
  • Describe the International Relations concept Levels of Analysis and argue which level, or levels, best explains and analyzes international relations.
  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the United Nations, World Trade Organization, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Cold War and its aftermath, the politics of the Middle East and American foreign policy.
  • Explain the impact of important historical events on the contemporary study of international relations and world politics.
  • Explain two theories of International Relations and argue which theory best explains International Relations and support said theory with appropriate evidence.
  • Describe the roles of national, international, transnational and sub-national actors in promoting or hindering international cooperation.
  • Analyze and evaluate key topics such as globalization, conflict, cooperation, diplomacy, international law, human rights, and international political economy.
Introduction to American Government and Politics POLI 1
  • Students will be able to differentiate powers delegated to the U.S. from those reserved to the states.
  • Students will be able to differentiate among changes in the American constitutional government over time.
  • Students will be able to marshal empirical data to support a political science theory.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the role of Congress, the presidency, the courts and their interaction with state and local governments.
  • Students will be able to analyze policy areas such as foreign and domestic policy in order to understand the political outcome of various policy alternatives.
  • Students will be able to evaluate the role of political parties, interest groups, elections and the mass media in the American political system with an emphasis on the state of California and its relations to the national government.
  • Students will be able to identify constitutional changes that have expanded liberties and rights.
Introduction to American Government and Politics - Honors POLI 1H
  • Students will be able to analyze policy areas such as foreign and domestic policy in order to understand the political outcome of various policy alternatives.
  • Evaluate the role of Congress, the presidency, the courts and their interaction with state and local governments.
  • Evaluate the role of political parties, interest groups, elections and the mass media in the American political system with an emphasis on the state of California and its relations to the national government.
  • Students will be able to differentiate powers delegated to the U.S. from those reserved to the states.
  • Students will be able to identify constitutional changes that have expanded liberties and rights.
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems GEOG 10 (VOC)
  • Analyze case studies of geographic problems and the procedures used to solve them.
  • Construct simple spatial databases.
  • Perform simple spatial data analysis using appropriate software.
  • Apply principles of geographic data display to GIS problems.
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate the results of GIS analysis through appropriate maps, documents and web pages.
  • Manipulate geographic data and the fundamentals of geographic data structures
  • Describe the fundamentals of cartography and the importance of map projections in constructing effective maps.
Latino Politics in the United States POLI 25
  • Students will be able to identify significant changes that have occurred over the past two decades in representation by Latinos in American government and politics.
  • Students will be able to identify similarities and differences in public opinion held by different Latino communities such as Mexican Americans and Cuban Americans.
Physical Geography GEOG 1
  • Describe common patterns of temperature and temperature inversions, high and low pressure, ocean and land winds, global winds, rain and desert patterns.
  • Students will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Define geography as an integrative discipline using examples of the Earth’s four spheres.
  • Examine the physical forces and processes that operate within the natural environment. \n
  • Identify how physical processes differ from place to place on the globe.
  • Apply geographical methodology in the interpretation of spatial relationships involving distance, area, and direction on the earth's surface.
Physical Geography Laboratory GEOG 1L
  • Interpret maps.
  • Construct maps using cartographic principles.\n
  • Evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Construct and interpret maps using cartographic principles.
  • Apply principles of earth-sun relationships to concepts of time, seasonal variations in solar energy receipt and overall climatic patterns on earth.
  • Analyze landform features through an understanding of tectonic processes as well as exogenic processes such as erosion and deposition.
  • Perform functions of temperature and pressure change using lapse rates.
  • Relate the distribution of vegetation to biomes and soil types.
Physical Geography Laboratory - Honors GEOG 1LH
  • Interpret maps.
  • Apply principles of earth-sun relationships to concepts of time, seasonal variations in solar energy receipt and overall climatic patterns on earth.
  • Construct and interpret maps using cartographic principles.
  • Students will evaluate the impact of science on their daily lives
  • Construct maps using cartographic principles.
  • Relate the distribution of vegetation to biomes and soil types.
  • Perform functions of temperature and pressure change using lapse rates.
  • Analyze landform features through an understanding of tectonic processes as well as exogenic processes such as erosion and deposition.
Political Theory I - Ancient to Contemporary POLI 5
  • Students will be able to analyze the development of political theory and its impact on the historical development of governmental institutions.
  • Students will be able to assess and classify contemporary political ideas in terms of their theoretical and philosophical origins.
Political Theory II - Early Modern to Contemporary POLI 7
  • Students should be able to explain the meaning of the terms public sphere and civil society in the theories of contemporary political theorists.
  • Students should be able to accurately explain theories of power and crisis associated with theories of thinkers covered in the course and to compare them
Urban Geography GEOG 8
  • Analyze the spatial variation of urban patterns around the world.
  • Describe the tools and theories used in research related to urban geographies.
World Regional Geography GEOG 5
  • Describe the physical, social, economic, political and cultural relationships between distinctive world regions.
  • Explain patterns of physical processes in distinctive world regions including climate and landform evolution.
  • Explain patterns of human processes in distinctive world regions including demographics, migration, language, religion, ethnicity, political processes, development and economic activities.
  • Explain the geographic tools used in regional analysis.
  • Evaluate the geographic situation, problems and prospects for each world region.
  • Analyze the spatial variation of human activities and physical processes in distinctive world regions.
  • Define the concept of region in geographic analysis.
  • Identify the location of the world’s countries, major urban centers, bodies of water, and other landform features.