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Student Learning Outcomes

Discipline: Degree: AA-T - Psychology - A0324
Course Name Course Number
Abnormal Psychology PSYC 19
  • Identify and analyze major psychological disorders using signs and symptoms from the current DSM.
  • Identify and apply theoretical perspectives used to describe the causes of mental disorders.
Biological Psychology PSYC 1B
  • Identify the major anatomical structures, and their functions, of the nervous system.
  • Students will apply biopsychological principles\/ findings to their own lives.
  • Identify the major structures and main sequence of events of neural chemical transmission.
Child Development SOC 15
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding physical growth and social, emotional, and cognitive development from conception to adolescence across all major concepts of child development.
  • Students will be able to apply a sociological understanding of the various social and environmental forces that shape child development.
Child Growth and Lifespan Development CHLD 10
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to summarize and compare theories of development. \n
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to describe typical development in the physical, cognitive, and social\/emotional domains throughout the lifespan.
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to identify biological and environmental factors that influence development from conception through the end of life. \n
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to collect and analyze data on relationships, skills, and competencies at various ages throughout the life span..\n
  • Students completing CHLD 10 - Child Growth and Development will be able to analyze data from observations of a child's play focusing on its various developmental functions.
Child Growth and Lifespan Development- Honors CHLD 10H
  • Students completing CHLD 10H - Child Growth and Development - Honors will be able to summarize and compare theories of development.
  • Students completing CHLD 10H - Child Growth and Development - Honors will be able to describe typical development in the physical, cognitive, and social\/emotional domains throughout the lifespan. \n
Critical Thinking PHIL 8
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies.
  • Students will be able to identify the premises\/reasons for supporting the conclusion within an argument.
  • Students will be able to apply problem-solving skills to their personal belief systems and social issues.
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong\/weak, valid\/invalid).
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments.
Critical Thinking and Writing PHIL 9
  • Students will be able to distinguish inductive and deductive arguments.
  • Students will be able to evaluate arguments (strong\/weak, valid\/invalid).
  • Students will be able to develop a thesis statement that advances a clear argument.
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies.
  • Students will demonstrate proficiency (precision, clarity, organization) in argumentative writing (with a minimum of 6,000 words for the semester), where positions are defended, and ideas are explored.
  • Students will be able to identify the premises\/reasons for supporting the conclusion within an argument.
Critical Thinking and Writing ENGL 1C
  • Students will evaluate the soundness of arguments.
  • In conversation with multiple texts, whether assigned by the instructor or chosen by the student, students will write a formal argument.
Critical Thinking and Writing - Honors ENGL 1CH
  • Students will evaluate the soundness of arguments.
  • In conversation with multiple texts, whether assigned by the instructor or chosen by the student, students will write a formal argument.
Developmental Psychology PSYC 14
  • Apply major theories in developmental psychology.
  • Evaluate the relative contributions of nature and nurture to human development.
Elementary Statistics Math 110
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter.
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters. \n\nUsing sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter.
Elementary Statistics -Honors Math 110H
  • Students will be able to determine descriptive statistics from a sample.
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters
  • Using sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter
  • Using bivariate data, students will be able to determine whether a significant linear correlation exists between two variables and determine the equation of the regression line.
  • Students will be able to use sample statistics to develop a confidence interval for population parameters. \n\nUsing sample statistics from one or more samples, students will be able to test a claim made about a population parameter.
General Biology - GE BIOL 1
  • Can students answer general questions about community and population ecology and natural selection after completing a related activity in lab?
  • Summarize the various types of evidence used to examine evolutionary principles.
  • Assess how population and community dynamics are affected by ecological interactions.
  • Describe how the systems of the human body interact to maintain homeostasis.
  • Explain why evolution is the most all-encompassing scientific explanation for the history of life and the similarities in biochemistry and physiological processes among living things.
  • Classify the molecules of living systems and apply basic principles of chemistry to their interaction.
  • Relate cell structure and physiology.
  • Compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of energy transformation in cells.
  • Evaluate how life forms duplicate, maintain control, and exhibit hereditary patterns.
  • An advisory prereq of READ 100 has been added to Bio 1 course outline. It is currently in the queue for review by Ed Design.
  • Students completing relevant assignments in Area B courses will evaluate the\nimpact of science on their daily lives
Human Reproduction, Development and Aging BIOL 13
  • Students will be able to explain the major developmental theories and scientific methods used to study development.
  • Students completing an assignment in Area E courses will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Students will able to summarize the biophysical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of infants, toddlers, children, adolescents and adults, and factors that influence these developmental areas.
  • Students will be able to explain conception, embryological and fetal development, and the birth process, as well as problems that may arise in any of these stages.
  • Students will be able to describe cell division, and the principles of genetics, with special emphasis on their impact on human development.
  • Students will be able to describe male and female sexual anatomy and physiology, including sex hormones and their actions.
  • Students will be able to discuss the impact of death in our Western culture, and how we deal with dying, death, loss and bereavement.
Introduction to Child Psychology PSYC 15
  • Compare theories of child psychology.
  • Apply physical (including changes in the brain), cognitive, and psychosocial (social, emotional and personality) changes throughout childhood (infancy through adolescence) to explain children's behavior.
Introduction to Logic PHIL 3
  • Students will be acquainted with the various forms of definitions and learn to construct proper definitions.
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies.
  • Students will be able to distinguish and evaluate inductive and deductive arguments using criteria of evaluation such as valid\/invalid, strong\/weak, etc.
  • Students will learn to distinguish arguments from non-arguments.
  • Students will be able to apply deductive and inductive reasoning to morals, politics, science, literature, and everyday life scenarios.
  • Students will learn to translate arguments into symbolic form to test their validity.
Introduction to Logic - Honors PHIL 3H
  • Students will be able to distinguish and evaluate inductive and deductive arguments using criteria of evaluation such as valid\/invalid, strong\/weak, etc.
  • Students will learn to distinguish arguments from non-arguments.
  • Students will be able to apply deductive and inductive reasoning to morals, politics, science, literature, and everyday life scenarios.
  • Students will learn to translate arguments into symbolic form to test their validity.
  • Students will be acquainted with the various forms of definitions and learn to construct proper definitions.
  • Students will learn to analyze informal fallacies. \n
Introduction to Psychology PSYC 1A
  • Apply psychological principles to personal observations and \/ or experiences.
  • Differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Demonstrate psychology is a science by explaining how psychology utilizes the scientific method.
Introduction to Psychology - Honors PSYC 1AH
  • Be able to differentiate the major theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • Apply psychological principles to personal experiences.
  • Explain how psychology utilizes the scientific method
Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology PSYC 3
  • Compare and contrast the various research designs and describe their relative strengths and weaknesses.
  • Describe the process of answering psychological questions from a scientific perspective.
Introduction to Social Psychology PSYC 20
  • Describe the ways in which principles gleaned from social psychological research apply to real world problems and issues.\n
  • Evaluate the reciprocal impact of the individual on social contexts, including social cognition, interpersonal attraction, discrimination, attitudes, conformity, obedience, aggression, and group dynamics.\n
Introduction to Sociology SOC 1
  • Students will identify the role of culture and socialization in the development of one’s beliefs, opinions, and values.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social institutions and the relationship between society and the individual.
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
Introduction to Sociology - Honors SOC 1H
  • Students will identify and apply the main sociological theoretical frameworks to analyze social stratification based on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality or other social groups.
  • Students will apply sociological research to distinguish the interrelatedness of various social intuitions and the relationship between society and the individual.
Psychology for Effective Living PSYC 33
  • Understand the processes by which psychological factors influence physical health.
  • Students will demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing their lifelong personal well-being.
  • Identify stressors in your own life and evaluate the effectiveness of your coping strategies. (replaces previous SLO #1)
Psychology of Reasoning and Problem Solving PSYC 5
  • Apply critical thinking skills to solve intra personal and interpersonal problems using psychological principles.
  • Identify correct and erroneous reasoning.
  • Distinguish between emotional and logical problem solving and how they relate to different situations.
Psychology of Sexuality PSYC 26
  • Identify and describe sexual and reproductive anatomy, physiology, and sexual responses.
  • Demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to increasing your lifelong personal well-being.
  • Describe differences in sexual attitudes and behaviors based on diversity.
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences PSYC 10
  • Perform and evaluate descriptive (e.g., mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation) and inferential (e.g., Pearson correlation, t tests, z test, and one-way analysis of variance) statistics.
  • Using SPSS software, correctly input data, analyze data, and interpret output for descriptive statistics, t tests, correlation, and one-way analysis of variance.
The Psychology of Women PSYC 25
  • Explain the concept of privilege as it relates to various minority groups.
  • Describe, compare and contrast the predominant theories of gender development.
  • Identify gender role messages in popular culture.
  • Demonstrate meaningful self-evaluation related to the role of gender in your personal experience.